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Posts Tagged ‘grand valley state university’

Millennials: The Reason we Can’t Have Nice Things (Vine/Instagram “Wrecking Ball” Parodies Mark Demise of Padnos Hall Sculpture)

September 17, 2013 Leave a comment

[UPDATE: The GVSU Wrecking Ball situation has been picked up by E! News Online, BuzzFeed, and now the Daily Mail in the UK.  For a while, there was a “@GVWreckingBall” parody Twitter account but it looks like it was suspended a few minutes ago. H/T @AdriWall]

GVSU Vine Wrecking Ball Parodies

Twitter is abuzz with the news that the pendulum sculpture has been taken down as a result of students being inspired by the video for Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball.”  A quick search of Vine/Instagram resulted in these:

Young people: fair warning – old people have smartphones too and participate in the same social media spheres you do.  That goes double for the guys smoking the hookah (not the most advisable thing to flaunt in Ottawa County even if it’s just flavored tobacco).

If you’re looking for a tool to search for Vine (and Instagram) videos – VineViewer.co is a pretty good option.  Fair warning – the first page loads *everything* available (which, for me, included a vine of a naked little person at a strip club jumping off the main stage into the arms of a patron who subsequently dropped her).  Yes, this is the age of Radical Transparency.

GVSU Email Hoax Takes Interesting Turn – Prosecutors Decline to File Charges

March 29, 2013 Leave a comment

As you may be aware, recently a student at Grand Valley State University was identified and confessed to sending out emails as part of a hoax that classes were canceled.  The Ottawa County Prosecutor’s office investigated the situation and has declined to file charges.

This is the curious part:

“‘We searched high and low and there was no criminal statute that we were aware of that was being violated,’ said Prosecuting Attorney Ron Frantz.”

Really?  Not even the Michigan Identity Theft Protection Act?  That’s curious because the Ottawa County Sheriff’s office even has a page devoted to handling ID theft cases.

Typically email hacking (as this appears to be a case of given that the email was purportedly sent from the professor’s email account) can constitute a variety of crimes:

  • Computer Fraud: Unauthorized Access to a Protected Computer is a crime if that computer system belongs to a bank or a governmental entity (which presumably GVSU is the latter).
  • Wire Fraud: GVSU uses Microsoft Exchange for faculty email, so it’s possible that this could constitute wire fraud if the server housing the email system is located outside of the state of Michigan (which is ever more common as we increasingly move to cloud-based data systems).

Even if the student didn’t actually access protected email accounts to send the emails (rather he spoofed the account information when sending the emails) I would think this violates identity theft laws.

UPDATE: Are Classes at GVSU Canceled Due to a Bus Accident and Weather? – HELLS NO

March 19, 2013 1 comment

UPDATE 2 – 3/25/13: See Below

Mark Twain once said “A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”

Let’s test that hypothesis in the era of social media.

GVSU Email Confirmed Fake

Right now, students at Grand Valley State University are circulating the image above which appears to be a screen capture from a mobile phone showing an email from a GVSU faculty member describing in elaborate detail why classes will be canceled tomorrow (3/20/13).

Some of my students forwarded it to me and inquired if I’d heard anything.  To date (7:50 pm on 3/19/13) I’ve received no emails from the administration, and there are no announcements on the college’s website, nor any messages pertaining to a cancellation on the college’s Facebook or Twitter pages.  Moreover, there are no cancellations for GVSU in the news media.

So it’s probably false.

What also makes me think the image is a fake is that there’s no date in the email (and I’m not aware of any version of the Gmail client that doesn’t at least show the date or time in the header information of an email).  I’m betting it was probably photoshopped.  To test my suspicions I ran the photo through Photoshop Killer, an online tool that detects when changes have been made to images.  The report seems to indicate photoshopping; in addition to the lack of EXIF data about the image, it appears to have possibly been sharpened (possibly to hide traces after blurring out some portions to edit them).

Photoshop Killer Analysis of the Image

It’s true, the weather hasn’t been optimal today – but it’s hardly bad enough for GVSU to cancel all of its classes at all of its campuses.  It’s also true that there was a bus accident on campus today A student was struck by a bus at GVSU a month ago – however the female student who was struck by a Rapid bus only suffered minor injuries.  Also definitely not reason enough to cancel all classes.

I sent an email to Dr. Kevin Cole, the professor from whom the email purportedly originates.

Updates to follow.  It would be great if we could debunk this in real time.

UPDATE: 9:40pm 3/19/13

Dr. Cole returned my email in record time confirming that, indeed, the email is a hoax.  Here’s his response:

GVSU Email is Confirmed as HoaxIt’s going to be interesting to see what GVSU’s Computing and Technology Support department finds when they go through the digital trail that this email likely left behind.  Unless this person was seriously savvy, it’s likely they will have left multiple bits of identifying information behind as a result of sending this message.

UPDATE: 12:45pm 3/52/13

A couple of days after this blog post, GVSU responded to the situation; apparently there were several instances of these fraudulent emails being sent.  Today they announced that they were able to track down the student who was responsible (who may now be charged criminally and possibly disciplined by GVSU).

On Spam, Josh Bernoff and Pointing Fingers – Responding to the Call to Clean up the PR Industry

February 25, 2011 2 comments

Pointing the Finger at PRSA

While perusing my RSS feeds, I came across a blog post by Josh Bernoff (Senior VP of Idea Development at Forrester Research and co-author of Groundswell) titled “PR professionals — clean up your industry.”

Interest.  Piqued.

In the post, Bernoff excoriates the public relations profession and specifically the Public Relations Society of America for spam email and lazy PR pros who send irrelevant pitches his way.  In the post he highlights five companies:  Seagate, GlassPoint, Calysto, Allen & Caron, and 5W Public Relations.  Arthur Yann, VP of Public Relations for PRSA did a great job of responding the very same day, and Bernoff graciously printed his response on behalf of the organization.

Before my [obnoxious] rebuttal, I’d like to point out that I completely agree with Bernoff; there are far too many PR people running around firing off irrelevant press releases in all directions like so much birdshot from a .12-gauge.

Moreover, I share Bernoff’s loathing for spam and unsolicited contact (so much so that I’ve gone so far as to track down the originators of unsolicited faxes and emails and contact hosting companies and file complaints with the state attorney general’s office).

I’d also like to say that I loved Groundswell; Bernoff and Li wrote a fantastic book that – unlike most nonfiction works – doesn’t coast on a few breezy anecdotal examples and factoids.  It’s grounded in quantitative analysis backed up by research.

However, claiming that the public relations profession has an obligation to clean itself up is as unreasonable as claiming that the sales profession has an obligation to clean itself up.  I’d also like to point out that, in point of fact, PRSA does have a “code of conduct that reflects the difference between right and wrong” and also a “certification for people who behave properly;” two facts that are readily available to anyone who googles “PRSA code of ethics” and “PRSA certification.”

I checked PRSA’s member directory and found the following about the handful of companies he named specifically:

  • Seagate: out of 52,000 employees worldwide, only one is a PRSA member.
  • GlassPoint: zero PRSA members.
  • Calysto: zero PRSA members.
  • Allen & Caron: zero PRSA members.
  • 5W Public Relations: out of 67 employees, only one is a PRSA member.

PRSA can’t spank people who aren’t members.  Part of the problem of unprofessional people equipped with technology is that a handful of them can do a lot of damage with relatively little effort.  That damage can usually only be repaired by repeated positive one-on-one interactions.  It’s kind of like trying to stop the tide from coming in armed only with a Solo cup.

When you point the finger, four point back at you.  Well … if not four, at least one.  Surely Forrester Research has never spammed anyone, right?  Whoops:

I’d love it if all of the spammy, obnoxious, lazy public professionals were loaded up into a rocket and fired into the orbit of a distant planet.  Their poor conduct invariably affects me in my dealings with the media or the general public which may hold past interactions with PR people against me.  But I work to win their trust one interaction at a time.  I’d like to think I’m pretty good at it.  That’s why I embrace the term “flack” (to the point of having it emblazoned on my employee ID card).

In addition to conducting myself in a respectful fashion, I also try to promote those same practices in others.  That’s why I’m a member of the board of the West Michigan Chapter of PRSA, and a professional advisor to the Public Relations Student Society Chapter at Grand Valley State University.

The good thing about bad PR people is that it’s easier than ever to cut them off at the knees for their tactics with the power of social media; email blacklists can easily be shared.  Just ask Chris Anderson.

Perhaps there’s an opportunity for Forrester Research to turn the tools against these people.  Create a tool that allows disgruntled recipients of shoddy PR pitches to submit their blacklist suggestions (along with documentation of the pitch) to a database that people can download blacklist updates from.  I’d happily volunteer a few hours a month to help vet submissions.