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Posts Tagged ‘Apps’

Why Twitter Brand Pages Aren’t That Important

December 9, 2011 Leave a comment

Why Twitter Brand Pages Aren't Very Important

Since it launched in 2007, Twitter has gone from a single utility to a full-fledged social networking site.  Just like Facebook and Google+, it’s now launched “brand pages” that allow owners greater flexibility in controlling how their Twitter page appears.

Meh.

Don’t worry too much if you can’t rush right out and develop a gorgeous customized Twitter profile.  Most people won’t see it. Read more…

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Video – My Team Competes in GRCC’s Innovation Competition

April 26, 2011 3 comments

Visualization of Parking Feature of App

My favorite thing about working at Grand Rapids Community College is the small group of amazing people I get to collaborate with on a regular basis on really innovative and tech-driven projects (many of which we’ve managed to get through bureaucratic hurdles and actually put into practice – like being the first college in Michigan to offer text message alerts for students/employees in crisis situations back in 2005).

Some of these people (Szymon Machajewski, Garret Brand, and Eric Kunnen) and I recently entered GRCC’s “Armen Award” competition as a team with a mobile application built entirely by Szymon in his free time based on a concept we developed that would help save both students and the college time and money and promote conservation and sustainable practices at the college. Read more…

Innovation? – There’s NOT an App for That

January 7, 2010 Leave a comment

Save your organization some money: don’t create an app for the sake of creating an app.

As an attempt at innovative thinking, that idea is well past its shelf life because the novelty has worn off.  They’re the digital equivalent of a pen with your logo and address on it.

Unless you’re truly providing something that people demand, something of value (ie something they can’t get any other way), or using an app in a unique way – you’re wasting resources.  This is particularly true if you’re developing an application for regular web use (as opposed to a mobile platform where computing power and bandwith are scarce and something compact/convenient is itself a benefit … for now).

Rather than letting fans vote on the contents of your beverage, find out what color alert we’re on, or telling a naked woman what to wear/sing in the shower – consider these questions:

  • Does your brand already have a community built around it and can you enhance that community with an app?
  • Is the nature of your product/service such that customers benefit from interacting with it while on the go?
  • Would you like to provide special access/benefits to a select group of early adopters and ardent fans?

If it’s not meeting those criteria – you’d probably be better off putting the money into beefing up your customer service operations.