Home > Online Reputation Management, ORM, Social Media, Social Networking, Twitter > Twitter Measurement / Analytics Tools

Twitter Measurement / Analytics Tools

With social media platforms like Twitter allowing open access to a lot of the data they hold, there is a sizable proliferation of tools to help chop, slice, dice and analyze what people are saying using them.  Below is a list of a few I’ve used along with brief descriptions about what they do (it’s likely a list I’ll have to keep updating – this list is by no means complete and a new tool seems to come along every day).

List of Helpful Twitter Tools:

  • Elliott’s Amazing Twitter Keyword Search Thing (words.elliottkember.com): a tool that essentially creates a tag cloud of the most frequently used words on a particular Twitter’s feed (counting and ranking them).
  • Trendistic (trendistic.com): a tool that organizes and graphs tweets over time (though the time frame is limited).
  • Trendrr (trendrr.com): a service (fee-based after 16 profiles) that tracks and analyzes and graphs a variety of search tools (news sites like Google News, blog sites like IceRocket and Google BlogSearch, and other sites like Flickr, YouTube and Ebay).
  • TweetMeme (tweetmeme.com): tracks, sorts and organizes mentions of a particular keyword (limited to the past week).
  • TweetPsych (tweetpsych.com): builds a profile of a particular Twitterer based on the content in their Twitter feed.  (Also has a companion tool for websites: tweetpsych.com/site.php).
  • TweetStats (tweetstats.com): graphs stats about a given Twitter account such as tweets over time, what interface was used to post the tweets, and who a user most commonly replied to.
  • Twellow (twellow.com): a yellow pages directory of Twitterers.
  • Twends (twendz.waggeneredstrom.com/):  A tool that not only tracks mentions of a particular keyword over time, but graphs and analyzes that data a variety of ways (including by using an algorithm to guess at whether or not mentions are positive or negative).
  • Twitalyzer (twitalyzer.com): an interesting analytical tool that uses a different set of categories to analyze a Twitterer’s presence.  They include influence (a composite that includes # of followers), signal (how much of your tweets are info vs. anecdote), generosity (how much you retweet), velocity (how frequently you post) and clout (how often people cite your posts).
  • Twitter Charts (xefer.com/twitter/): an aggregator that uses Yahoo Pipes to create an interesting visual display of a specified Twitterer’s posts over time.
  • TwitToaster (twitoaster.com): a service that aggregates tweets that are all part of a single conversation (nesting them visually like a discussion board) as well as providing statistical analysis.
  • Twitter Grader (twitter.grader.com): applies an algorithm to rate how influential a particular Twitterer is based on factors like their number of tweets, how recently they’ve posted, and how many followers they have (and how powerful those followers are).
  • ViralHeat (viralheat.com): a fee-based service that searches for, tracks and graphs keyword mentions about a particular keyword or username.
  • WeFollow (mashable.com/tag/wefollow/): a directory of Twitterers.
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  1. October 6, 2009 at 9:32 pm

    You’re missing one of the best, my favorite: Twitalyzer.com

    Like

  2. derekdevries
    October 7, 2009 at 3:29 am

    Thanks for the tip! I hadn’t seen Twitalyzer before; I like the interface and the rubric it uses to analyze posts which is rather different from what most of the other analytics sites use.

    Like

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