Home > Facebook, Higher Education, Social Media, Social Networking > You’re not a Master of Social Media if You’re not on Facebook

You’re not a Master of Social Media if You’re not on Facebook

facebook800lbgorilla

In a recent blog post on Inside Higher Ed (Visiolibriphobia: Fear of Facebook *), Professor Afshan Jafar discussed her concerns with Facebook that keep her from using the platform.  Here’s an excerpt:

“Call me crazy, but I am not on Facebook. That’s strange for somebody my age and stranger still for somebody who belongs to a group of writers here at UVenus who are masters at using social media.”

I have two issues with the article:

  1. You’re not a master of using social media if you’re not on Facebook.
  2. It’s impossible to stay off Facebook.

Permit me to explain…

1. Mastery of Social Media

You’ll have to forgive me if I’m touchy about the subject of social media mastery.  A primary means I make my living is through my understanding of social media, and my ability to ply my trade is substantially hampered by people who falsely claim to be experts like me.  Regrettably the learning curve with SM is so great that the average person often isn’t able to distinguish good practice from bad practice.  I’m hardly alone – virtually every profession or area of technical expertise faces this problem.

The 800-lb Blue Gorilla in the Room

Facebook is easily the most massive social networking site world-wide – particularly in the West.  Right now they’re coming up on one BILLION users – or one 1/6 of the planet.  Mastering social media inherently requires a thorough understanding of Facebook given its dominance.  To be a social media expert and have no ongoing hands-on experience with its most key player is the equivalent of attaining a Master of Film Theory degree without learning anything about Sergei Eisenstein.

Social Media’s Shifting Sands

Online the only constant is change.  As such, remaining a master of social media means constantly learning, growing and evolving with platforms.

To wit: every single social media presentation I do is different.  I often stay up late into the night before a presentation revising it with the developments that happened that day.  I even modified a recent preso I did for Crime Stoppers International from one day to the next because the social media world had changed significantly overnight.

Professor Jafar qualifies my first assertion by arguing in her article that Facebook nurtures two characteristics of McDonaldization (efficiency and calculability) that are harmful.  Hopefully Professor Jafar is heartened by the fact that we as a society have evolved away from those measures precisely because of the effect of McDonaldization.

Social media experts AND Facebook know that impersonal shotgun blasts of information are far less effective than one-on-one engagement and discourage it (in the case of Facebook, its algorithms will de-prioritize that content so it shows up in the newsfeeds of fewer users).  Even casual users of Facebook are opening their eyes to this reality, and todays’ students are getting better at communicating differently to different audiences.

With respect to calculability, virtually everyone from tweens to multinational corporations know that sheer numbers don’t matter online.  Actual interactions and action are what matters – and those qualities are rarely present in inflated numbers of fans or friends.

2. You ARE on Facebook

Whether or not you want to be, you likely are on Facebook already.

If you know anyone who is on FB (or possibly even people who don’t know you), doubtless they’ve uploaded photos of you, updates about you, and if you’re a publisher of content like Jafar – that is being shared, liked, and commented on in Facebook.  Institutions or events also publish content about us – like TEDx Conferences:

At the very least every web-accessible digital snippet about you is searchable through Facebook:

AfshanJafar_FacebookSearch

The ubiquity of recording equipment in society means that there is constantly digital documentation of our behavior.  We’re able to ignore this reality on a daily basis because it’s usually never interesting.  That changes the minute we do something sensational or outstanding in either a positive or negative sense.

In Professor Jafar’s case – this likely takes the form of her students discussing what an excellent teacher she is.  Right now these wall posts, photos and posts are mostly unsearchable in Facebook – but that will invariably change as our notions of privacy evolve and become more permissive (a massive shift in public opinion that Pew has documented).  The pressure Facebook is under to monetize its users will only accelerate this trend.

Don’t get me wrong – Facebook should give everyone pause with respect to their privacy.  They’ve made a number of moves over the years that remove control from their users over what is shared about them.  A decade ago, staying off a social networking site was a viable pursuit, but we’ve reached a saturation point where that is no longer the case.

The solution is not to abstain – it is to engage.

When you refuse to engage digitally (be it on Facebook or the web in general) you accomplish two things:

  1. you lose the opportunity to monitor what is said about you and…
  2. you give up the ability to contribute to the conversation about you.
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,686 other followers

%d bloggers like this: